Tuesday, April 24, 2012

"The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation"

This anonymous letter landed in my inbox about a minute ago:
Hello,

After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.

Between the late 80's and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

Thank you.

2,493 comments:

  1. For those of you who are doubtful, perhaps this article by Carherine Austin Fitts will help;

    http://www.dunwalke.com/

    It's a big read, but very revealing; it really pulls back the curtain, and amazingly by an insider in the HW Bush admin.

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  2. I'm from the projects of Philadelphia. I'm a fan of Hip-Hop. Rap music infiltrated Hip-Hop and then the confusion started. The article makes almost complete sense. Especially when you throw in the idea of repetitive radio. The radio is just beating our children to their deaths with ridiculous, lust laced, and criminalized lyrics. I can remember when I stopped listening to the radio. My daughter is 11 and she knows the difference between real Hip-Hop and what the radio is trying to present as Hip-Hop. It is so obvious to see when you have great musicians that can't sell records because their music is too moving and the lyrics are too true to make a difference.

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  3. OK, so following this logic a little further 19th Century Romantic Orchestral Music created the Wars of Europe and America, Early 20th Century Jazz and other popular music of the time created the economic boom of the 20's and Prohibition, etc., etc. Statements like this without an authoritative, verifiable sources are not reliable information. Let's move on to something more significant like my cat saying, "I can haz cheezeburger." Higher probability of being true.

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  4. UNEBLIEVABLE, YET VERY BELIEVABLE. THIS COUNTRY AINT SHIT. THATS WHY BOB BARKER WHOM MY GRANDMOTHER LOVES OWNS PRISONS. IM SHARING THIS ONCE A DAY. ALL YEAR LONG. THANKS FOR SPEAKING UP FINALLY. 200 MILLION INMATES LATER...TY REALLY

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  5. Kill rap and hip hop!

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  6. Great story, but lacks integrity simply because the writer chose to stay anonymous. This could be just another conspiracy theorist and that's why the writer chose to conceal his identity.

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  7. True or not... there's some important timeline issues people are not seeing. If you look at those that started getting popularity in "gangsta" rap.. mainstream-wise you had Ice-T, who was telling his stories since the 80s, N.W.A.. which blew everyone's minds in a similar way that Nirvana did in rock music because they were not the norm and went a different direction, and then you had Too $hort, who had been making tapes in the mid 80s, 2 Live Crew brought the x-rated sex raps starting about 86/87. What I noticed quickly as a hip hop fan in the late 80s early 90s is that people wanna copy what's good. Next thing you know, Run DMC is puttin out "Back From Hell" cursin' up a storm, which they didnt do. You had Big Daddy Kane go from music to groove to with slick witty raps to the r&b thing which wasnt working to "ok now I gotta be hard like the other guys" but trying too hard. enter a whole new breed of rappers who were excited by NWA and wanted to make music.
    At the same time you can't discredit Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul, still trying to speak positivity. But times were gettin dark. Amerikka's Most Wanted came out and was dark but ultimately positive to those who chose to see it. But then NWA's second album came out. Where was "FXXX The Police?" Instead we got "To Kill A Hooker" and "She Swallowed It". Hip hop was already turning dark. So was rock music. The 80s were over, the Bush empire started, then riots happened, it all got ugly! Nobody wants to do the cabbage patch when people are gettin shot and the city's on fire. Art reflects life. The Chronic happened. Death Certificate and The Predator happened. Major landmarks in musical history. And with any great art comes a host of copycats, or at the very least people influenced by that that don't quite understand it. Then you get a copy of a copy of a copy. Then at that point for anyone old school to sell music, they feel they need to compete, so they try what isnt them. Hear any of the late 90s albums by any of those that did it right in the 80s. Some were able to be creative in that sound. Some it just wasn't working. Right now we have so many people making hip hop that have lost sight of what was uplifting about it in the first place. At least there's an indie element coming up in music lately and people striving to be positive and still be on top again.

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  8. most rap music contains some kinda psychotropic rhythm that acts on a persons character. I have always wondered why and now I know.

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  9. This comment is week.

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  10. obviously your living in a wonderland. I love hip hop that talks about the real issue or just for fun. But I hate fake gangsters trying to promote some bullshit lifestyle. You need to open your eyes, and support your fellow man. We need to stop being dooped by the record labels and corporation.

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  11. If you think there isn't much reaction to this, then consider almost every part of life is this corrupt. Schools do every bit of bending they can do to make it look like they perform on standardized tests. Administrators screw teachers who want to actually teacher but won't cow tow to the race for numbers. Kids aren't important in schools -- it all for politicians and administrators. It all about personal profit. Either find a new game or start playing because you're in the world of capitalism now and it all for profit, at any cost.

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  12. No proof or hard evidence is stated.

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  13. What makes this so crazy is that 50% of today's youth ACTUALLY either knew or were told about this kind of thing taking place as the 90's were passing into the 2000's and beyond. We easily see whats been going on over the years, thanks to REAL or better REBELIOUS rappers like Brand Nubian, Arrested Development, Public Enemy, Nas, Tupac, and etc. letting us know what's been going on. The problem NOW is that the society has gotten so caught up on the mainstream rap, that, those who really had something to say were being either denied on radios and tvs or were being covered up. We knew for the longest but since they're LITERALLY paying these so-called "rappers" today MUCH more to dumb people down and fool them into thinking that it's alright to sellout and be imprisoned, people only cared about the money they were getting from it. Which is why rap is so horrible and REAL people who have something to really say are being covered up or denied.

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  14. Yeah crazy shit if this is true...but if is all 4 of you gettin' offed now...

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  15. As an active Hip HOP Artist, and producer I have to say, this sounds possible. The entire planet, and all facets of media are directed, and exploited this way. This is no surprize. The powers that be are in control of our everyday function. Work, recreation, media, video games, cartoons. Mind control is an age old tactic used by the forces of evil

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  16. Not buying this for one minute

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  17. Sounds like the Famous "Willie Lynch Speech" Hoax... Well intentioned … but Bogus;-)~

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  18. This magnificent Lady has been fighting this last 14 years: http://www.lizajessiepeterson.com/peculiar-patriot.html

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  19. Subhanallah...DEEP

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  20. I believe this because ive heard somethin like this from other sources a documentary on rap talked about how in the early 90's regular rap groups where dropped and the labels begain to only sign artist who were willing to do the new kind of rap they were trying to promote.I even heard Rakim talk about how they stop signing regular rap artist and went down this path.people who dont think this can happen are exactly the kind of humans the label owners love because they are ignorant of how curropt this industry is.they love people who dont question them,challenge them or investigate them. they want you to just stay ignorant and go with the flow so they can manipulate and controll you

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  21. Rap, like most religions, has been hijacked by Big Brother. It's being used as a tool of oppression, misinformation. But parents are also responsible as they sit by as their children are destroyed!

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  22. Yeah...many are oppressed by their own lack of movement, but racism is so prevalent as a glass ceiling or crab in the barrel that it looks crazy when you try to argue against it's existence and effects. If someone is truly held back only by their own means...everyone can/will see it, you don't have to point it out. However, making a broad statement insinuating racist oppression doesn't exists reveals you as more glib than the fool you thought you were responding too. It's like watching someone argue with a fool from a distance....
    That being said...the "Congo" mentioned real events and in justices to support his claim, let him live. You...I mean, I'm not gonna take the time to explain racism to someone who's mind is made up...waste of time.

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  23. When its surreal its usually the truth.

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  24. I never understood how the child geniuses could become so arrogant without noticing fundamental differences between them and the general public. There is a personality type that will always make it to the top. Yes, I would have made it had I grown up with a parent on crack or the lavish lifestyle of private schools, maids and porches for my birthday. But would my brother have been so lucky....probably not, he benefited from the cushion of the money. To be clear and more specific, the generations of money; not sure if just my parent's money could have kept him supported. I see this more clearly as a Black person living what few live and seeing both sides. I would have made it anyway (there's my arrogance) but my brother got the luck of growing up with a mimic of white privilege, I'm just not confused about it.

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  25. It's like a crime novel partially based loosely on the prison industry conspiracy. The government has been actively destroying a certain people for time.

    Whoever thinks gangsta rap was a business decision wasn't listening to Hip Hop in the 80s and 90s. Maybe guys like Ice-T followed certain trends, but mainly rap's voice came directly from it's environment, not "decision makers".

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  26. This article is a very pertinent piece of information which should be made public to the communities in which it affect. Between flooding the communities with drugs, namely crack and the psychological subliminal subversion via music, makes it quite obvious of the downfall & destruction of Babylon (AmeriKKKa)is upon the horizon, so the whore must devour those whom she has wronged since her establishment

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  27. Everything he said has pretty much been known, because the Music labels control what is put out.... but the link to the prisons is what makes it more disgusting... I thought it was to bring the minority race down and make money doing because ppl bought the music, but to bring more ppl to the prisons that's sick...all for a profit...smh

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  28. Damn. Mind=blown

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  29. Look at the prison numbers since then.

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  30. Look at the prison numbers since then.

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  31. The anonymous writer of the letter has issued a new statement which WaxPoetics.com posted in the comments section today. It begins with the editors of WaxPoetics.com clarifying their stance regarding the letter. It's too long to post here but here's the link. It was posted on May 4th.

    http://www.waxpoetics.com/blog/news/music-industry-confession

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  32. Could it be true? Of course.
    But like the brother said earlier, Black people were killing each other prior to hiphop. Sure hiphop's change could make the prisons more profitable, but things had already changed with the drug laws before that meeting.
    Blacks were already getting locked up with the crack game, and that was what started all the political rap music anyway.
    Just another distraction because even if we was singing opera, this society would still find a way to lock up the people who they don't want to employ and can't use anymore.
    They started locking up people because of the civil rights and the riots that happened. That was the real plan. To make sure no niggas were on the street-sober or active to get behind any real movement. So you take a million of the smartest and most aggressive niggers off the street, employ about 30% and don't worry about the other twenty percent.
    All the gang leaders and leaders of Black organizations that could move people are all locked up in federal prisons

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  33. can someone explain to me how building prisons and the more inmates inside can be profitable ?
    cause I dont thik prisoners pay rent when they go to jail !

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  34. Amazing how some people don't want to believe a story of conspiracy. This is one thing that will get passed by these days with only the thought "Another conspiracy theorist spits out trash." This is truly what befuddles me about society in this day and age. No one investigates into stories like this one before becoming one of these naysayers. The internet is a powerful tool, I wonder how many actually remember that its original intent was to be used as a tool for research.

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  35. >paralympics
    >the olympics for paraplegics
    >has nothing to do with their mental capabilities
    >lol

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  36. I'm not the biggest fan of rap music(I Like Some of it), and I never read any Hip Hop publications online or copy. I discovered this thread purely by accident from a link on Disinfo.com and was hooked because of the parallels, the parallels, of this argument and one I have held for many years concerning not rap music but the Grunge movement in the 90's. It always seemed to me that Kurt Cobain was killed because he cracked under the pressure to maintain that facade of angst ridden teen, new punk, anti-establishment, that was being pushed on the disenfranchised white youth of the time. The 1% don't want all white people to focus on success and becoming part of the system, that would make it way to competitive and uncomfortable for the established elite, so it began to seem to me that it was in their best interest to distract the youth with music and art movements that would make them reject the mere notion of ever being part of the system and encourage them to become part of a new wave of hippie longhairs. Angry, wine-ing, spitefull of authority, drug felony self incriminating long hairs. I was there, wasted allot of my time before I became hip to the scam and decided to go back to school. We should'nt reject the system, we need to flip the script and become part of the system THEN change their rules. Otherwise all we are is meat to them and I refuse to be meat. I confess I still like to scream along with Nirvana, it just means something that I chose for it to mean, I have no problem changing he Lyrics I I find It produces a more positive message for me..Try It with gangsta rap I'm sure it works.Its like Chaos Magic. I credit this Deftones song [Back To School (mini Maggit)] from the white pony album for helping me wake up. Check It Out. Ironically it was from out of the Grunge era too.

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  37. Deftones: Back To School w/ Lyrics
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VW1nxUChYfQ

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  38. It would seem that the truth would be so obvious in hindsight, over 20 years later, and this vague anonymous letter seems to answer a whole lot of questions in people's minds. I find it to be unnacceptable to take this at face value as it reads like a conspiracy theory misdirection campaign. First of all ever since slavery was legally abolished in the 1880's (not ended, it just changed its face) jails were filling up with black bodies. The incarceration rate has ALWAYS been high for this group of people. BLACK MALES HAVE BEEN TARGETED EVER SINCE THEY WERE IDENTIFIED AS A GENETIC THREAT! Excuse my caps but you gotta know its bigger implications.

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  39. Certainly the implications are great but eugenics is only one of many concerns that the 1% feel are a threat to their power and their status quot.White kids who aren't related to them are trying to get into "their" colleges and their social "Circles", white kids who aren't trained to keep their mouth shut by growing up in their rigid totalitarian societies, white kids who are less likely to be hazed into compliance by college fraternity rituals, Blue collar white kids. The same ones I contend the depression and hopelessness laden Grunge media was aimed at. Not unlike the European man that wrote the letter that started this whole thought provoking thread. The 1% don't want us to think, just to shut up and consume. That white man didn't and neither will I a Chicano.

    I understand what you are trying to say but the implications might be bigger still than black and white. No disrespect

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  40. the govenment pays these private prisons a monthly rate to confine offenders that may cant stay at a government owned prison.maybe because its overcrowded or its cheaper .this is how the owners of the private prison make their money.its definately a business set up to make money off of inmates and its perfectly legal as long as its operated right.but of course as humans people will corrupt anything. I was reading about some of the curruption in them that has happen this is what makes this guys story very credible. I dont know a lot about this but I can easily see how a record company can have a hand in one of these prisions and desire to fill it up so they can get that money from the government.I heard one private prison was getting $315.00 a day for each inmate if you have jus a thousand inmates thats $10,000,000 dollars a month.Of course they have expenses but I get the idea of this.GOOGLE "THE CORRUPT CORPORATE INCARCERATION COMPLEX" YOU WILL SEE THAT THIS MAN STORY COULD VERY WELL BE TRUE!

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  41. This is absolute bullshit!

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  42. Quit committing crimes and you won't go to prison. Simple. There are no other excuses. Blame yourselves. When will you people realize this? Stop with excuses. Get a job and then teach your children how to hold down a job and respect themselves and those around them. Not generation after generation teaching your children how to milk the system. Your community as a whole is full of excuses. There are none for black in America today. If you think so try living in South America for a while. Or even back to the 'mother land'. Not that one person here was even born there. Just ignorance getting passed down. You should be embarrassed for worshiping money.

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  43. tHE FIRST RULE OF WAR IS TO KNOW YOUR ENEMY . IF YOU ARE IN DENIAL THAT AN ENEMY EXIST THEN YOU HAVE ALREADY BEEN DEFEATED .. TAE HEED TO THE VARIOUS FORMS OF INFORMATION THAT WILL BE COMING FORTH SOON AS THE STAKES GET HIGHER AND THE BEASTS OF THIS DIABOLICAL ORDER BEGIN THIER FINAL ASSAULT ON THE MINDS FREEDOMS AND SOULS OF A VERY VERY GULLIBLE PUBLIC .. IN THE WORDS OF GEROGE CLINTON .. THINK IT AIN,T ILLEGAL YET !

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  44. I don't know what to believe, but this certainly does not surprise me. I for one believe to a degree music does influence us, in some capacity. These artists become our role model, and in some cases, our only dominant male figure. Ultimately however I believe you are the captain of your own ship. Weak minded people music or anything else outside your self and family interfere with your thought process. Guess that makes some of weak minded.

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  45. Crazy? yes, but I can believe it. Too $hort wanted to be more conscious but was told by his label that they dont want him to save the neighborhood instead he kept it ratchet due to what the top guns wanted. This shit right here is very believable, Prison system makes & spends more money than education... yeah its some dirty shit going on in this world that people know about.. PEOPLE GET PAID SO MUCH MONEY JUST TO SHUT THE HELL UP.

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  46. It's crazy that i came across this. just yesterday i was thinking about why artists now days talk about the same crap and are gettin signed! as tho we are too retarded to see whats happening to our society. It makes no sense that Gucci Mane is even still being heard, getting all these young rappers to promote selling and buying drugs to flip and thats how they got their new lambo.....? this subject baffles me so much to the point where i don't even know how to put it in context correctly! like I jus heard Drake talk about fronting his friends Cocaine on the song "Amen" off of Meek Mill's, Dreamchasers 2, claiming that's what he's gotta do since he grew up with friends and being the one that "made it". Okay.. shouldn't you be finding out how to employ them OFF the streets and not in the streets so they can get killed by another maniac influenced by a fkn Rick Ross (who's prolly never sold a thing except music in his life). It jus pisses me off! and yet we read messages like this to help us but blow it off cuz we been brainwashed like a mufucka

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  47. P Diddy and Suge Knight held the interview.. enough said!

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  48. Wow man just wow

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  49. My ? would be to the author and to ask "what he is willing to do to rectify this grave created disparity?"-----there is recourse; however; his reluctance to name or be named causes question as to whether or not he will suffice for the warranted action necessary!!!!!!!!!!

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  50. It's absolutely believable. Thanks for posting this.

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  51. IAM SO SHOCKED ANYONE SUPRISED CAUSE THIS IS GOING ON IN EVRY ARENA IN BIG MEDIA IT TRULY DEEP THEN EVEN THE NEW LETTER WE TALKING ABOUT NOW SO THE QUESTIONS IS WHAT U GONE DO NOW..WE ARE THE POLICE NOW AND WE LOOK AT IT LIKE A JOB WHEN IT GENOCIDE WITH BENIFIT....SO PRAY TO WHO U PRAY TO CAUSE MY GOD WONT HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH IT OR THOSE KIND OF FOLKS....REAL TALK....JREALIST 08 YOUTUBEIT..BLACKPOWER!!!1

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  52. WOOOOOW SO IT ALL MAKES SENSE NOW I HATE TO SAY TO YALL T.I FANS BUT HE JUST WENT THRU THIS OVER CRINIMAL BEHAVIOR HE GET CAUGHT WITH ARMY GUNS AND HE WAS OUT A YEAR LATER???? COME ON YALL TALK TO ME MAN SOMETHING IS GOING ON

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  53. The ParaOlympics are NOT for people with developmental disabilities. They are for folks with physical disabilities. And. You're a dick

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  54. Punk'd on a worldwide scale lol

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  55. oh yeah the government gets money to pay these private prisons from a portion of the taxes we pay so actually its our tax dollars that goes from the government to them.this may or may not be going on today.remember he did say 1991 they could be on to a new sceme by now but who can actually say that over a 20 year period that nobody from the music industry invested money in this in order to make a profit.especially when they see how bad crime is and how many people are getting locked up and how the music continues to promote behavior that will help some land in jail.its a perfect business opportunity.people who dismiss this are people who havn't did their homework and researched this.they act as if this is impossible like a record label could never pull this off if you take the time to research this you will clearly see how this can happen.1 private prison was already charged for paying a judge money to send felons to their prison and give them longer time than they should have served so they could make all that extra money off of them.I clearly read this and it had nothing to do with this guy this lets me know that he's not the only one talkin about this curruption GOOGLE "THE CORRUPT CORPORATE INCARCERATION COMPLEX"

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  56. sk yourself:
    Did Rap (the music) change?
    When did it change?
    How did it change?
    Did Hip – Hop (the culture) change?
    When did it change?
    How did it change?
    Which Hip – Hop or Rap changed first?
    What new drugs/products where introduce in to the inner cities?
    Who introduce the new drugs/products in to the inner cities?
    When did the new drugs/products get introduce in to the inner cities?
    When did the private prison industry come in to being?
    When did mandatory minimum sentences come in to being?
    What new crimes carried mandatory minimum sentences?

    Plug your answers in to a timeline!: (

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  57. um he is from europe? can you properly use their sentence formations? fuckin bite me asshole

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  58. I was going to post this as well. GREAT Documentary.

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  59. Rumor baiting with intent to "save culture" has always proven to be counterproductive.

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  60. Isn't the audience who buys most of the gangster rap middle class and upper class white kids? Were they the ones this mysterious person wanted to go to jail? I think this sounds like a fake.

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  61. The main reason why gangsta rap and all this talk about money and bling bling is what most artists are putting out nowadays is because shock sells in America. Plain and simple. Feel good, positive music isn't what people want to hear, they want to hear music that makes them look cool and badass. That's why it's all crap now. It has nothing to do with putting people into private prisons. That's just nonsense. If people raise their kids right, they wouldn't get into trouble in the first place. It's a family and social problem, not a music problem.

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  62. In 1980, private adult prisons did not exist on American soil, but by 1990 private prison companies had established a firm foothold, boasting 67 for-profit facilities and an average daily population of roughly 7,000 prisoners. During the next twenty years (from 1990 to 2009) the number of people incarcerated in private prisons increased by more than 1600%, growing from approximately 7,000 to approximately 129,000 inmates.

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  63. Damn it, I spilled Whiskey on the carpet!

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  64. This is only a very small piece of the puzzle

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  65. So wait, something this big and they expected some stupid agreement would stop people from talking???? So how do you explain groups like NWA who were talking about this in the 80's?? The only thing this story left out is that they were all white and the next day the meeting was about how to produce crack and get it in to the ghettos to thin out the herd. Cmon man!

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  66. As a indie label owner/hip-hop artist myself I can believe this wholeheartedly. The question remains is it true? It very well could be and if it is...it is sad. I will surely do a little research myself to gather more info kn the subject and then determine how true this could be. But I have preached about things like this for years. The fucked up thing about this is the best rap music came from that era. We all should be able to see how this story could be true. A lot of things now make a lot of sense. I hope some people take this seriously and realize how possible it was for such a meeting to take place. Such a terrible stain lrft on yhe music and industry I love. I echo the feelings of most who commented, REAL change needs to be made in how WE conduct ourselves and what WE hold dear. WE ARE THE FUTURE OF THIS WORLD AND WE NED TO EDUCATE OURSELVES AND UNDERSTAND WHAT GOES ON IN THE WORLD...

    Dig Luciano
    Owner Untouchables Entertainment
    www.digluciano.com
    @DigLucThaOne

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  67. It's an absolute shame that you have been subjected to this kind of dehumanizing dupocracy. Secret meetings have probably always gone on right under our noses, for the purpose of gaining wealth at the expence of the masses.It's an outrage and yes,something should be done about it.I for one move that we hold a "secret"meeting and invite the world to watch us expose these creeps, as well as have a coca-cola. Thank God for the enternet!The roots of rap came from the hills, the Appelachian area, I believe for the purpose of telling a story. It,s too bad it's being used to promote criminal behavior to the tune of making money for a few thugs owning private prisons. That's worse than slavery. It's entrapment! There are way too many mature individuals who are too,too willing to take advantage of young minds and hearts. I guarantee whoever these people are, they have thier reward, that they are responsible for the ruination of so many young lives....Remember this.........when you touch someone's life... good or bad....you've touch the life of evryone they know. Pray that when you reach out with hand,thought,deed or word, you are lifting some one up and lessenig thier burdens somehow. Bless all of you for participating.

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  68. THEY TOOK CERTAN RAPPERS AND MADE THEM SELL OUT and gave them other careers such as Ice T to stop the real rap from being told he and other who were directing a movement Public Enemy and more others who had messages to stop those stories about sellin drugs and killin one another just think about how some fill out of sight just saying it could be ture

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  69. An anonymous letter, secret meetings, national conspiracies, thugs with guns, this story has all the makings of a suspense novel, which is why it is so hard to believe. If the author gave up his identity, and it could be confirmed he actually had influence in the industry, well that would be one thing, a shred of credibility, but this? Sorry I don't buy it, and those thugs with guns from twenty years ago? They aren't coming after you in rural france or wherever you are so stop being a panty waste and start naming names or stfu.

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  70. An anonymous letter, secret meetings, national conspiracies, thugs with guns, this story has all the makings of a suspense novel, which is why it is so hard to believe. If the author gave up his identity, and it could be confirmed he actually had influence in the industry, well that would be one thing, a shred of credibility, but this? Sorry I don't buy it, and those thugs with guns from twenty years ago? They aren't coming after you in rural france or wherever you are so stop being a panty waste and start naming names or stfu.

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  71. "Gangster rap is important to rap and hip-hop music and it still is and always will be until the conditions of our neighborhoods change."

    That's a dumbass statement.

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  72. Sorry, but it's* true.

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  73. How many other stories and businesses have been infiltrated in this manner, by fear and domination techniques?
    My biggest concern is he is being entirely honest with us and these kinds of activities are going on all around us. Not just for private prisons but for personal profits no matter what is does to the societal whole.

    Yes we have seen Rap rise ad we have seen our prisons full but most by illegal laws created by a Corporation in the first place. Corrupt only creating more corrupt because they are out of control of themselves destine for global power regardless of what effects this creates.

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  74. Pretty ironic that Ice-T is now a regular cast member of Law $ Order.
    I miss the days of Digital Underground and Tribe Called Quest. I wonder how MC Shock G would feel reading this letter.

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  75. how can we make everything better though? yeah that all happened.. but now how can we go back to the true roots of the culture which is dj breaking mc and graffiti? instead of this rack city swag bs! that has nothing to do with the roots.. instead of sitting with the media break free and become if ur real HIP HOP you know ur roots and not all into this political agenda and on a more spiritual unity sense of mind!

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  76. I believe this. The hidden, top ring-leaders are out for money, money, money, and they are racist pigs who do not care who they exploit so they can have more money for themselves.

    Private prisons are a very real thing in the United States, and I have no doubt in my mind that they act to "recruit" more people into their spiderweb. This country is fucked.

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  77. I DEF AGREE THEY LISTEN 2 A LYING ASS COP SO U CAN SELL THESE PPL ANYTHIN

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  78. THIS PPL GO 2 GOOD HOMES THOW BUT WE HAV TO DEAL WIT HAVIN NO GOOD HOME

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  79. this is complete bull shit. i was in nyc in the hiphop world then. nwa and ice t and other OG rappers were quite political. but then they got rich and, like everyone else, switched sides. they didn't need any cabal to get them to do that. the money did it. their interests and class position changed. as for record companies being invested in the prison complex, that would be very easy to prove--there were only so many majors that had hiphop acts, and only so many companies involved in private prison construction/management. it would be easy to see whether they overlapped in any significant way.

    mostly, however, if anyone thinks hiphop made people into criminals that's idiotic. the environment and poverty made them into criminals. the music might have glorified the life but hardly anyone who wasn't in that environment would listen to a gangsta rap song and decide to become a criminal and go out and start selling drugs or robbing people or becoming a prostitute.

    that said, i wouldn't be surprised is some bizarre group of neocon businessmen weren't TRYING to do this. but if you look at the major companies involved in hiphop at the time and the people running them, it's just not plausible--def jam, tommy boy, warner bros, sony, etc. you saying russell simmons would do this? you're saying chuck d wouldn't have found out or ice cube and blown this up? this was also the moment of consciousness rap like the fugees and arrested development.... it's just not an accurate portrayal of what was the reality at the time.

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  80. dont be pussy, post the names

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  81. This is Good... I believe EVERY WORD... Keep the focus of getting this out... ITS MUCH NEEDED!!!!!!! THERE is a world beyond the world that we see!!!! PEOPLE NEED TO RECOGNIZE THIS AND BE AWARE that we are being influenced by whats hidden in PLAIN VIEW!!! you cannot let MEDIA raise your children!!! THEY aren't just doing something..to be doing something.. they are trying to SHAPE THEIR LIVES!!! #witchcraft is real! But so is the POWER OF GOD!

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  82. "After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991"

    --Uuuuuh, so if you're doing it anonymously now, why couldn't you do it anonymously then? Oh right, because it's nonsense.

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  83. that's word yo. although, i can't entirely believe this account- but, from a sociology point of view mixed with experience (being a musician/friend of producers...) this shit has always been going down. so, if it takes this or, similar accounts to open your eyes... well, then i support it 100%

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  84. This article is ridiculously stupid... Yes regular people are stupid, but at the end of the day they still make choices. I am a hard core metal head, but i don't kill, rape, rob, worship satan or do anything that would be considered a stereotype except for the way i dress: skater shorts and rock t-shirt, outside of that good luck finding something to put me in the masses, oh wait i have tattoos..

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  85. There is no doubt in my mind that this letter is fake. Perhaps it serves as a reasonable metaphor for how corrupt large industries throughout the world become in order to generate increasingly large amounts of profit, but anything past that is pure bullshit. It is obvious that rap moguls and record label owners were able to profit off of the content generated in "gangster rap", but "stating" that they owned stock in private prisons is ridiculous. If this person really wanted to uncover the brutal truth of this story, he would release his own name and the names of those who were involved.

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  86. Sounds like a cooked up story to justify the garbage that is Rap music. Even if the story were true, responsibility still lies with those who buy the music and promote it. Nothing can change that fact. Rap music by and large today is just an extension of the community it derives from, as is the typical attitude of blaming others.

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  87. Veracity aside, look at what's evidence based. The rise in gansta rap coincides with the privatization of prisons. The shift was sudden and extreme. Conscious rappers are seldom heard anymore, not because they have nothing to say, but because the industry won't back them the way the once did. It is enormously expensive to promote a cd, organize and execute a tour, etc. It may seem outlandish, but if you owned interest in a business and found that another seemingly unrelated business could aid you in generating many times more revenue that you'd ever earned before, is that not a relationship you would seek to secure? That's all this commentary speaks to. The relationship between the prison industrial complex and the entertainment industry as a whole. It's not just rap, but that's the part that's relevant to this discussion. The fact that rap is the predominant music form for people of color and the ratio of incarcerated blacks to whites is something like 3:1, is something to examine more closely. Search Google Scholar with terms like "prison industrial complex", "incarceration rates by race", "recidivism by race", and you will get all the info you need. The problem is that the academic research that bears all of this out is ivory tower stuff that rarely translates to the masses. That's not a coincidence. The same companies and individuals invested in prisons are also invested in universities. It's how they legitimize themselves. It's their public face, the one that says "no child left behind", but in fact, banks on those left behind children to populate their prisons and generate income for them. No, hip hop is not the root of our problems as a people, but it IS a problem in it's current incarnation. There are plenty of other issues that need to be addressed, but sometimes the most seemingly innocuous ones are the ones that we should really focus on. Music changes norms. Let's change them back. Decency and civility are rapidly becoming a rumor instead of the standard. It's frightening and as I get older, I fear for myself and my peers who will be at the mercy of this coming generation, many of whom have no regard for what is right and honest and decent. Don't worry, we're not alone. White people are going to suffer the same from their children...they already are suffering and it's only going to get worse. Moral decline, y'all, that's the root of it. Moral decline.

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  88. OK, so what school was this?

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  89. I'd like to simply see some evidence of record industry executives or even record company subsidiaries or shell companies investing in private prisons.

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  90. This was on reddit weeks ago.

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  91. I smell the Illuminati

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  92. Willie Lynch letter for the new age? I think yes! Whether you believe it or not the things in this article have manifested themselves in proportionate numbers in the black community. Yes there as crime before rap, but you cannot sit here and say that rap music did not take a sharp turn for the worse after the 90's.

    Music has long been a tool for mobilization of the masses for good and unfortunately for bad purposes, and not just in this country but all over the world!

    I will say this and be done, to me it is not so far fetched that an industry dominated by whites, in making policy and marketing particularly, would do this. America is the home of capitalism by any means, just look at wars, shes even willing to sacrifice her own for profit, at the same time this is the same country that SPECIFICALLY passed legislation and laws to oppress, suppress, etc blacks for profit.

    Connect the dots...it's crystal clear to me!

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  93. Well, we know what happened to music. It was hijacked by some corporate gansters

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  94. the state of the rich you speak of is being addressed as we speak. Keep your eyes open for a world consumer group (name still to be determined,) that will enable buyers to finally force the hands of the large corporations they way that community buyers can influence a local business.

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  95. So what?!? Prison is where niggers belong, anyway! The more of the apes locked up for decades, the better! Better yet, increase black abortions and sterilize all nigger bitches on welfare more than a a year!

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  96. http://www.datpiff.com/Crunchy-Black-Streets-Need-To-Eat-mixtape.349196.html

    HHMG IS I THE BUILDING. SUPPORT CRUNCHY BLACK

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  97. Good point, but anyone can come up with a story like this and make accusations. We're in 2012, popular gangster rap is dead and has been since the 90's ended. Why now? Why all of a sudden the urgency to rid of guilt years after the fall of gangster rap? An regarding the music industry's involvement with prison, that connection shouldn't have been that hard to make, seems like something that would be in Freakonomics. But as far as me believing the actual story of this European man wanting to clear his conscience ain't gonna happen. There's way too many holes and flaws in this and absolutely no evidence whatsoever to prove any of his story. Sometimes I think the internet will be the death of the truth, and maybe even of us.

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  98. I don't know quite how to take the story because there is no way to verify it, but I do know this. The United States is a capitalistic society. Money buys anything, and profit is often put before people's welfare. The extent of this greed is big enough to destroy this nation from within, through a combination of subversion and stealth politics. I mean, look at what the Obama is doing in the name of 'change'. His policies have sold us out to offshore interests, and far from fix America he is cutting her up and forcing us to be part of Mexico and Canada. Our population is exploding. You know why we lie down and take this? Because we've been conditioned not to think for ourselves. This country, and it's people, will destroy themselves from within before they realize what they've lost. Your land, your freedoms, the very things you take for granted, are being raped and pillaged as we type - all in the name of change, of progress, of equality. The corporations are selling death, the politicians are packaging it, and we, the public, are sucking on it like bee's to honey. You just look how far this country has destroyed itself in the past few years, how much it has consumed.. it's shocking to say the least. We will never wake up to the reality of this situation until we have no land left worth defending. For it is in our nature to destroy ourselves one way or another. Welcome to the American dream.

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  99. it is happening again.

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  100. As a community worker, I promoted Hip-Hop raves for street kids in 1990. This happened in Portobello, London. These kids were mostly from Spanish, Caribbean, Portuguese, Irish and Moroccan descent, they were street kids, bored but full of imagination and creativity. One of those kids was Silver Bullet, another was Flex, Moroccan Rai too.
    Are you trying to tell me that I was part of a conspiracy myself along with all those kids?

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  101. What he's supposedly talking about is not hip hop, its gangster rap. Hip hop is a great form of music, but anyone can tell the difference between A Tribe Called Quest or Gangstarr and Lil Wayne.
    Even most people in gangster rap would probably say that they were just talking about their life and their experiences. Many of them actually use that background to promote positivity, like Snoop Dogg.
    Point is, mainstream music has taken an obvious turn for the worse for many of the past years, and its clear that the industry has been promoting materialism, complacency, and destructive behavior in the apparently "popular" music.
    Barely anyone I know actively listens to or enjoys most of the music on pop radio; hearing about something like this is incredibly unsurprising. Gangster rap did get an incredible financial boost in the 90, and the real hip hop went underground.
    The consequences of this may not be easy to put on a graph, but they have certainly been immense.
    Music is awesomely powerful. It's very sad that there's had to be so much filth in an industry that should be all about light.

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  102. This is pure BS! Hardcore rap was already popular before 1991. NWA, BDP and others were already hugely popular and were the reasons for "Gangsta rap" becoming maun stream. Also in the late 90's rap stoped promoting the hard core stuff and now todays popular mainstream rappers are people like drake. So does that meen that theese prisons don't need the help anymore?

    The fact that no names are mentioned shows that this is fiction.

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  103. The original posting and the comments need to be read hand in hand with this: http://www.dunwalke.com/
    It's by Catherine Austin Fitts and it's about how a famous Wall Street bank was involved with the financing of the private prison industry.

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  104. Black America fell in love with crack. I saw it happen.

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  105. This doesn't surprise me..jus like the civil rights movement...if u can't beat em...kill em or keep em as dumb as possible so the truth will never surface...smh

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  106. I've been listening to rap since 1989 and I've never gone to jail. Besides I don't think that a justice system as inherently corrupt as the US justice system needs much help in finding people to imprison.

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  107. Translation: Another attack on rap to make alternative and ghost music stand alone and stand out by default. Nothing that originates from a divine source will be controlled by some caucasians in a meeting. A trick to make it seem they have that power. Only those who see certain humans as superior will believe this dumb shit.

    There, that should help you out.

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  108. Intersting post! I thought for a long time that it is truly weird that a government allows all the negative and crime-promoting messages in music as it is being promoted and send on the air, while at the same time it is being hypocritically proclaimed that this country needs to do something to become more peaceful and balanced here at home.
    It seems that the trick works with great tunes and melodies that wants to make a person dance while such garbage is being displayed in the lyrics.
    The subconscious of a person, and due to repetition of grooving to the beat opens a door as it auto-suggest to accept the negative message as pleasant because of the 'feel good beats'.

    Since I have become a mom I started to pay a lot more attention to what my daughter is allowed to hear and watch. I also belong to a generation who went out to party and dance around these time, yet I never felt drawn to any songs that spoke about hate crime, drugs etc. It was always a natural 'turn-off' for me.

    Rap-Music is mostly carried by its message, and if a society, a nation, truly wants change for the better for all people we are to start to utilize Rap for positive message conveying.

    The other part in this post, about private prisons also sounds illegal. A government that supports such whereabouts clearly breaks the law not only in a 'law-enforcement-sense', but also on a moral status.

    The only way to protect onself and our children is to simply refuse to participate by changing the chanel on the radio, TV etc. when a 'negative message song' is played.

    If they don't make money with these songs any longer it won't be sold any more. This boils down to a point where people truly have to wake up and become more self-conscious by taking responsibility for their indiviuality and personl freedom of thoughts and speech.

    People are to STOP running with the heard and become more critical while respecting oneself more concerning what one allows to enter their five senses and what come out of one's mouth.

    I also noticed that the music industry has decreased their selection of songs played on the radio. At times it gets so very boring to listen to the same songs over and over again. I barely listen to the radio but searching the internet for good quality 'Old School Music' as well as new artists coming up who actually care which words slip their mouth.

    It is in YOUR power to say "NO" by simply refusing to participate by switching the channel or to turn the radio/TV off!
    After all ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS! ;-)

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  109. I always thought there was something wrong with the music industry. Its not just rap anymore....country, and rock too. I have always felt there was a evil corruption in music these days. That is why I try to stay away from the mainstream radio.

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  110. I was believing the story until guns were pulled out...something doesn't smell right. If this guy(from Europe) went back to Europe, why is he so fearful? He's either the world's biggest pussy, or he's full of shit. I think he's full of shit. C'mon, RAP create criminal minds. Criminal minds create RAP. Don't believe everything you read. This article, if made into a movie, would be a SHITTY MOVIE. Believe that.

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  111. I agree. Total boooooshit.

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  112. It is difficult to believe as someone wrote above, because there is no verifiable documentation or proof. That said, this is not far-fetched. Just like with the Tuskegee syphilis experiments, man has been known to manipulate information and abuse a particular group of people for his own gain, whatever that gain may be.

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  113. The Body is the Holy Temples property. Listen to music that is pleasing to the spirit and involve yourself not in the ways of the heathen. @theJudahite

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  114. There was a similar meeting in the early 70s involving the music industry and a shadowy group who were investing in spandex and glitter.

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  115. I find this to be a dubious story. First of all, if he was so shaken to the point where he had to pull to the side of the road, why didn't he leak this story to the press? There's no way knowing who could have leaked the story. Secondly, how could these private prison execs possibly know their plan would work? Thirdly, gangsta rap died out pretty quickly and now we just have party rap, what happened? Thirdly, why does this person have to remain anonymous? Finally, I seriously doubt that representatives from a private prison would pull out a gun at a secret high level meeting with music industry execs, no matter how heated things got. I simply don't buy this story.

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  116. Why are Black people so stupid as to believe this stuff?

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  117. They Don't Really Care About Us

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1pqi8vjTLY

    Keep watchin'

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  118. ive been saying this shit for years! i watched as my peers went from listening to jazz,blues,r&b to rap! gangsta started with easy e! he was the industry 1st monkey, and after that now we got lil wayne who is a devil worshiping mf??? ive did my research to the matter! and you cant debate this thread, it is what it is. they using my people and talents to kill us off and its working! i was too lured by it and inspired, but after careful examination, they can have it!

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  119. ive been saying this shit for years! i watched as my peers went from listening to jazz,blues,r&b to rap! gangsta started with easy e! he was the industry 1st monkey, and after that now we got lil wayne who is a devil worshiping mf??? ive did my research to the matter! and you cant debate this thread, it is what it is. they using my people and talents to kill us off and its working! i was too lured by it and inspired, but after careful examination, they can have it! see i know things my people dont know been knowing for years. its about extinction, and prisons to a race of color! 752bc this was when we were over thrown technology, boats, chariots, mathematics, the real brother hood! the real Illuminati members garments strip once used for good is now being used for evil!!!!!!!!! the pyramids im talking city of Atlantis pyramids! not known of that homemade set they used for moses and the rest of christen catholic greek/roman events!

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  120. what happened to harmless and political metal? or rock? It's not just rap, if you buy into the article, you must also consider that there may have been more than a RAP meeting. Rap is by no means enough to fill ENTIRE PRISONS

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  121. We will share this. Blog.therevofev.com

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  122. Truth is always way stranger than fiction! The masses are blinded an artist and I were talking and he was saying how it ached his heart to do damaging music and this is exactly why he hadn't written anything and that his music was radio friendly, but this explains why hiphop has become a muse for violence BET is nothing more than a counterfeit watered down version of real life!

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  123. The American "peoples" economy is fueled by the entertainment industry, we buy what is "in".. So if crime is glorified and made to seem glamorous by these young kids who look, act, and come from the same places as so many of us, of course it will become popular. This makes perfect sense to me. I agree with shizle above 100%. First hand I have seen proof of what the author is talking about here. Read the book 1984. Listen to Nas' album Nigger. Watch the movie JFK. Not a conspiracy theorist by any means, but just think outside the box for a quick second.

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  124. Are you people all sheep? You seriously believe this bogus story? It cites no sources. It provides zero proof. My Korean grandmother could've written it. Black rappers promoted gangster rap and now somebody wrote this crap blaming the white man. Quit blaming rich people for your problems and start taking responsibility!

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  125. I agree. Bogus story. Some white person wrote it to stir up hate.

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  126. It doesn't surprise me I saw it happening and could never understand how the talented artist with a message never really took off. I always new it was a conspiracy against and they used our own weapons against us Each one teach one until the Damn breach comes

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  127. If this really happen the ILLUMANATY is all over this, that's why it was so sercertaive.

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  128. All i can say is Thank you, As a Talent Agent i know music set's the tone when the rap music came out it was the N word all over the radio in every rap song to the point little kid's and grown black men would greet each other by saying yo my Nigger. and still do, up until now, how crazy is that, a word whites called us as slaves , now we hear our woman being talked about as the B word and whores, saying bend over this and that while many of our Rap artist in and out of prison, when it's time to get out it's a grand thing for everybody to show up at a night club to celebrate, so i guess when their kids ask where are they going parents tell them we're going to celebrate, that their favorite Artist just got out of jail ,so it's time to party .....it time to look at our self as people it would be a Great start to see how can we make things better and stop letting Rappers, money, and jail house's control us, before it's way to late ....

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  129. This not the truth unless all names are called. We all will die someday, so fearing harm to yourself or your family, is not a good enough reason to not include names. The living GOD is in control, not man.

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  130. This not the truth unless all names are called. We all will die someday, so fearing harm to yourself or your family, is not a good enough reason to not include names. The living GOD is in control, not man.

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  131. i read this article a week or so ago on another page. of coarse this happened. we should be in an outrage. knowledge is power and we can begin to change what was what is and what will be. secret societies do exist. we know this. we feed into media all the time. thoughts become things. this is common sense. use the information of the negative and be all things positive. we can look at " why is there a liquor store on every corner in black america" " the ratio of black men in prison to white men" the story goes on. it breaks my heart. even if we think we have nothing to offer, sharing information is a start. amen. thank you for posting this.

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  132. And if you had details you would believe the story as the truth? It wouldn't matter there wouldn't be anyway too prove if anyone was there or what was discussed. If you weren't there 21 years ago its all here say.

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  133. Last time I checked music one of the powerful environmental factors. Go into any store in America, and if they don't play music you like you Probly won't buy anything. Try to overpay for your clothes when there is only the sound other shoppers shuffling around. Now hoop into a car with your bestfriends drive around town and jam out to nothing. Music can make a revolution like in the 60's & 70's. The same is bars and clubs restaurant. Music in adolescents tell you what kind of relationships you make in school. What kinda partners we chose.

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  134. 2Pac interview about Media Influencing the Public

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snRniWppvpE

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  135. It sounds plausible to me, tho I'm a rocker from way back; and never thought the vocal lines musical.

    I can tell you this: if you want to find out the truth of it, it is a matter of research. You should be able to find out via Internet research if, e.g. record companies bought a lot of prison stock before promoting Rap, if prison populations have increased since, if sales to fund the contras and the like funded top rappers, etc. A tip like this can be very valuable, because it tells you where to look. True, it would be better if the poster or someone similar came forward ...

    BTW: This reminds me of an article, "Ronald Reagan created Rap music".

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  136. Many errors in the way of seplling correctly that would indicate to me this person was in NO WAY a professional. Read it again please, too many errors to type out.

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  137. I was thinking the same thing. Faaaaaaaaar too many grammatical errors to be from a "professional."

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  138. this "agreement" wouldn't mean anything or stand up in any court. this story is also complete made up bullshit. you don't need them to kill you, you kill yourselves.

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  139. Agreed. Even so, it wouldn't surprise me if this was 100% true.

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  140. Wow! I dont know if I believe this, but it makes sense. As a consious Hip Hop artist I challenge EVERYONE to WAKE UP!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMtGPjVuw8Q

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  141. It's all a part of the devil's plan, but in the end God wins! I know this is true. One thing the world wants to take from us is truth and it dies so by feeding us false lies, hopes and dreams. What is wrong is seen as right, but the truth is that it's really wrong and those things which are indeed true are seen as wrong...Wake up people!

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  142. how about some evidence?

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  143. is this cat for real man ,,this all sounds so crazy man ,,this person has no grounds and has no proof,,to back up his story,,we just supposed to believe some person that talks alot of stuff,,this is not right man,,get some real proof and then if you can talk about it,,do something about it,,that is if you gotzz proof man,,good luck

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  144. I don't need an article written by a European explaining why the music industry destroyed true Hip Hop and imprisoned an entire generation of youth, to open my eyes and see how this country is the most racist, fucked up, congregation of idiocracy...all I have to do is walk around my block. This shit had been happening and will continue happening until people like me and you rise up, destroy, and rebuild this country that has been labeled "land of the free" for far too long.

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  145. Assuming this letter is, in fact, true and the new influence of gangster rap led significantly more blacks to commit violent crimes, the fact that the author did absolutely nothing but protect himself and his family is just as criminal as the conspiracy he sat in on. This man fully realized the amount of destruction potentially being caused and yet still failed to act

    Whistle-blowing can really fuck up someone's life; go down that road and find out for yourself. But this man had the opportunity to potentially save the lives of thousands of people as well as their families and decided to save his own.

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  146. This is BS, a hoax!

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  147. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=acaQmpNkDGE

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  148. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=acaQmpNkDGE

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  149. The author says he can’t identify himself because he’ll bring himself into harm’s way, but his story betrays that privacy. Consider what he gives away about himself:
    - A European who came to the states in the early 1980s
    - “Decision maker” at one of the more established companies
    - Withdrew from music scene and eventually quit in 1993
    - Was one of four people escorted out of a meeting where only 20-25 were present (started with 25-30 but a few walked out when asked to sign the confidentiality agreement)

    The organizers of the meeting would take one look at this story and immediately know who the author is – they might remember on their own, but if they didn’t they would surely have a stack of those confidentiality agreements or a list of attendees. Even the other 16-21 attendees who did not get escorted out of the room can probably remember who did, and based on the other info the author provides I bet they would be able to identify him too.

    I don’t disagree that there’s untold corruption the public will never know about, but I don’t believe this one.

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  150. i have seriously suspected this since i was a kid, and with this story i truly believe that this man is speaking the truth. i used to watch a lot of music tv (mtv, tmf and likes ((i'm from europe))) but when they started to bombard me with music that always went about violence like killing, raping, robbing, i just stopped watching and went online to find out real nice music (wich for some would still be terrible) but i never liked 90's rap music just because it gave a bad vibe, still does nowadays..

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  151. 'Anonymous said...
    Heated debates on the internet are like the Paralympics: even if you win, you are still retarded.'

    This idiot can go fuck himself, and learn what the Paralympics actually are whilst doing so.

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  152. Dave Emory has done plenty of research on the music industry's nasty ties. BMG's parent company, Bertelsmann, has a very sordid history. From wikipedia, "During World War II, Bertelsmann was the biggest single producer of Nazi propaganda."

    Also, this woman Holly Hood has some very interesting stories and history to share in her book about hip hop being taken over by occult and corporate interests. Apparently she saw it happen first hand. Very interesting stuff. Check her out.

    http://hiphopilluminati.blogspot.com

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  153. Those who are not believing this. Your wrong. I was in the surreal situation as well and well know as a victim or witness as you would like to call it. The odd one out in the meeting but the one with the knowledge to know what was happening to the rap music, society and public was getting at. This is no joke. All i have to say is, what happen,happen for the future, the future was meant for the worse since the past was the plan for the bad. Those who do not get the fame, are better off trying to create power.

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  154. This is complete fiction.

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  155. I never liked hip hop or rap that much except for Tupac and a few other miscellaneous songs and think the idea of races other than the human race and the social-ethnicities it contains is a completely retarded concept, knowing what we now know about genetics, but something like this, manipulation through media to serve the multiple converging ends of greedy bastards, wouldn't really surprise me much at all. The "war on drugs", which is completely illogical and can never be won by stopping supply using foreign coercion while imprisoning massive numbers of non-violent users, has the exact same upside down double think logic. A rational that says "forget the fact that rehabilitation is not only cheaper, more effective and is actually the morally correct path and instead lock them up for life after 3 strikes", yeah...that makes perfect sense. This idea says that we need to "Push certain people down to give everyone else, or at least the ones that matter, a hand up", it is absolute idiocy that misses the point that a "rising tide lifts all boats" and instead tries to pretend that a "rising boat lifts all tides". When one starts to see it in one place then it pops up over and over again almost everywhere from our financial systems, education, "justice" system, national defense ie: the "war on terror"...sure whatever the hell that self perpetuating and never ending concept is, historical oppression that has echoed down the ages, to the entire structure of modern Governments which are essentially designed to fail either through inaction or overreaction. All of it rooted in the subtle doublethink that embeds the idea that we are responsible for ourselves but not for what goes on around us as individuals and ,therefore, as a group while at the exact same time subtly and in direct opposition imposing the view that the mystical "group" is more important and individuals exist to serve it. Then also indicating the "Government" keeps everyone safe and protected, an absolute lie because without vigilance and personal responsibility those who cannot see further than their nose, those who gladly usurp the name "group", will strip away everything they can from every individual in their quest to feed their insatiable greed for wealth, then power and eventually absolute control, all in the name of "safety" and "security", more lies. Do not believe anything I say nor anything some "expert" tells you and instead take a look at what "we" have created, continents where people starve while on other continents people spend billions for their opulent toys. Does that make an ounce of sense? It can be easily justified but doesn't it seriously, even damnably, indicate that something is completely off the tracks? Many people will just continue to play the game by justifying everything and pretending that somehow it makes perfect sense. Not me, not anymore, it's too much work to uphold that lie. My eyes are open whether this story is true or not and I absolutely reject the environment which has been raised up and dropped on most of humanity then blamed on the "evil nature of man". It is complete bull that is nothing more or less than a self fulfilling prophecy. What would be better? I do not claim to know, but if this is the best we can do then whatever hell we further create is probably well deserved. All I can do on my own is hope that more people come to see that something is very, very wrong with the systems and environments we have created and learned to accept and live with today and then whenever that new and improved viewpoint appears, work together with them to try to make something better, then share that different and possibly better way of doing things, or at the worst slow down anything that exacerbate everything that is wrong today. Anyway, peace to all.

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  156. I think that there is and always will be crock,s ready to step in on any opert.(FORGIVE SPELLING)I Owned a bis. for 25 year,s an worked for mostly ritch they will do thing,s to make money that would sicken most folk,s!But the thing is how do you bring down the Bilderburg group?And there the real culp. Behind it all! Do,nt get me wrong I will fight till the end.But I think the main thing every one scould be doing is trying to get right with God First an then fight wrong were ever you see it!

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  157. What's there to debate. The stiory seems highly plausible for anyone that lived through the beginning of the Rock-N-Roll era ..... 50s- early 60s. ...... Dick Clark, Ed Sullivan, Payola scandals, etc.

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  158. "a parent-less society is being raised by Snoop Dogg while Calvin Brodus is at home raising his kids." Exactly! That is the rub of the whole hard-core rap industry, making Pookie and Ray Ray pick up a gun and shoot their neighbors because they wanted some sneakers, or a reputation or whatever while the rapper in the video goes home to his Jewish neighborhood and read the Wall Street Journal. Those record industry creeps and private prison investors in that smoking room did not invent rap, nor do they claim to. They just established and perverted something started by the aforementioned NWA and Skooly D or whatever his name is. I just got finished read "The FBI War Against Tupac and Black Leaders" by John Potash, and will be interviewing him soon on blogtalkradio. I Urge you to buy that book, based on 12 years of research, and then get back to me on facebook and twitter (Chris Stevenson/pointblank009 or @pointblank009 & @buffalo_bullet).

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  159. as millions of dollars were suddenly being spent on violent gangsta rap groups like bitches with problems, ice t, tupac, biggie, NWA, , gangsta-lene t-shirts, "wave your guns in the air" videos , at the same time budgets were pulled on groups like jungle brothers, tribe called quest, digital underground, pharcyde, black sheep,deee-lite, queen latifa, Monie Love, Salt n peppa,etc.....and on and on I suspected at the time ,this was an organized plan to change the public's perception of blacks to make our culture afraid of blacks just as the crack infiltration into u.s ghettos was a way to do the same thing = FILL U.S. jails with black youth- both federally owned and privatized. the goal has been achieved and it's heartbreaking to a lll of us who were aware as it was happening.

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  160. 2PAC left the meeting, Suge and Dr. Dre stayed. I stayed. Jay-Z stayed. Andre 3000 and big boy left. They didn't invite Public Enemy who was THE BIGGEST rap group at the time. I knew what was up and left the music industry the next day, never to work with the new regime of rap artists ever.

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  161. Dear annonomous writer, I wondered to myself ,did you ever think of redemption, or how to help in silence. You who sit on such a great information on plans on how to destroy a race of people. While one group of people is being taught to die and kill each other another group of people is being taught they can to watch this happen and do nothing. This will in turn destroy us all as a human beings losing regard for life. Maybe some extremist groups are right when they say the white man is the devil. Who spreads this way of thinking and why? One sure as hell cant take money with them after they die and whats it worth when you have so much you cant spend it all.

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  162. The story could be true. The story could be fiction. The story could be bread crumbs on a trail that leads to nowhere since there are no names, leads, blah blah blah. The industrial prison complex has been in place since Reconstruction in the 1800s. The only difference is in the transition media access and in Rap/Hip Hop the prompting of fear of Black people was reawakened. Study and research the industrial prison complex www.prisonactivist.org/information.

    No one can effectively disagree that our media has been super effective in promoting images that impact generations and identity. From seeing Elvis, American Bandstand, Soul Train, BET, MTV, and local news coverages we are bumbarded with "what's going on" in the world - The Latest and the Greatest! I won't go into other complex marketing trends like sagging pants, big clothes and other clothing trends to emulate music icons, or how it is no different than wearing cross-colors and African continental emblems in the 90s, or disco clothes in the 70s. I won't talk about how our country promotes glamor and fear of targeted populations to deflect from the capitol gains from emassing the fear. I will say that for me the author of the original story did not demonstrate to me what he felt guilty of. He did not demonstrate where in his career he tried to provoke change within or outside the industry. For me, it was a story that was spun on a blog to see what sticks.

    Keep your minds open and Question EVERYTHING! Be Critical Thinkers and Make Change!

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  163. The story could be true. The story could be fiction. The story could be bread crumbs on a trail that leads to nowhere since there are no names, leads, blah blah blah. The industrial prison complex has been in place since Reconstruction in the 1800s. The only difference is in the transition media access and in Rap/Hip Hop the prompting of fear of Black people was reawakened. Study and research the industrial prison complex www.prisonactivist.org/information.

    No one can effectively disagree that our media has been super effective in promoting images that impact generations and identity. From seeing Elvis, American Bandstand, Soul Train, BET, MTV, and local news coverages we are bumbarded with "what's going on" in the world - The Latest and the Greatest! I won't go into other complex marketing trends like sagging pants, big clothes and other clothing trends to emulate music icons, or how it is no different than wearing cross-colors and African continental emblems in the 90s, or disco clothes in the 70s. I won't talk about how our country promotes glamor and fear of targeted populations to deflect from the capitol gains from emassing the fear. I will say that for me the author of the original story did not demonstrate to me what he felt guilty of. He did not demonstrate where in his career he tried to provoke change within or outside the industry. For me, it was a story that was spun on a blog to see what sticks.

    Keep your minds open and Question EVERYTHING! Be Critical Thinkers and Make Change!

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  164. The story could be true. The story could be fiction. The story could be bread crumbs on a trail that leads to nowhere since there are no names, leads, blah blah blah. The industrial prison complex has been in place since Reconstruction in the 1800s. The only difference is in the transition media access and in Rap/Hip Hop the prompting of fear of Black people was reawakened. Study and research the industrial prison complex www.prisonactivist.org/information.

    No one can effectively disagree that our media has been super effective in promoting images that impact generations and identity. From seeing Elvis, American Bandstand, Soul Train, BET, MTV, and local news coverages we are bumbarded with "what's going on" in the world - The Latest and the Greatest! I won't go into other complex marketing trends like sagging pants, big clothes and other clothing trends to emulate music icons, or how it is no different than wearing cross-colors and African continental emblems in the 90s, or disco clothes in the 70s. I won't talk about how our country promotes glamor and fear of targeted populations to deflect from the capitol gains from emassing the fear. I will say that for me the author of the original story did not demonstrate to me what he felt guilty of. He did not demonstrate where in his career he tried to provoke change within or outside the industry. For me, it was a story that was spun on a blog to see what sticks.

    Keep your minds open and Question EVERYTHING! Be Critical Thinkers and Make Change!

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  165. obviously like most of you i'm not surprised but more than anything it makes me sad and hurt-then straight to angry. no one rapes me in the ass like that and gets away with it!! this is sick shit but who should pay? its everyone with an investment. how can we hold those people accountable? please dont tell me to vote, i'll fucking shoot you.

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  166. This is bullshit.The author displays a lack of knowledge and respect for rap music and it's entire culture.Hip hop is the most d.i.y. music genre there is.Name a rapper and most likely he owns his own label or is on one owned by one.Furthermore,Too Short was pimpin hoe's back in 82' followed shortly thereafter by Ice-T,KRS-One,Scarface and the Ghetto Boys,N.W.A.,and U.G.K. to name but a few.This meeting took place in 91?Then explain why A tribe called quest and the rest of the Native Tongue rap groups made such a big impact around that time.Or why M.C. Hammer was movin Michael Jackson numbers or why Hammer flopped when he tried to go hard.Facts:M.C. Hammer made catchy music and Hammer did not.N.W.A. sounded so good they made you want to spark a blunt and shoot a cop....and Public Enemy sound like shit and suck.And although certain rap music may lead impressionable youth to make bad deciscions,I'm quite certain other circumstances play a much larger factor.And if somebody is in prison because they were inspired by Dr. Dre to commit a "crime" and were not inspired to make a beat,then I say let em fuckin rot,cause a loser is a loser.Also,I thought the article betrayed a lack of respect for black intelligence.

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  167. I saw it happening. All of a sudden you don't hear a Public Enemy or KRS even Big Daddy Kane on the radio anymore. When you can here a songs by Young Jeezy openly talking about selling dope you know there is something up. The shit just went down hill. Like an earlier post said if this isn't true the effects are real. Just like the Willie Lynch letter people say that is not real but I'll be damned if the effects aren't real.

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  168. IM SURE BOB JOHNSON WAS AT THAT MEETING. QUICK SOMEBODY CHECK HIS PORTFOLIO.

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  169. Wow you said Pubic Enemy sucked... What planet do you come from... In 91 I was in a Sociolgy class and we were talking about private prison and how it was geared towards Black youth... I was then told to read a book called Savage Inequalities by Johnthan Kozol,if that's how you spell it... In the book the author showed the difference between what was being spent to educate the youth and what was being spent to lock theses kids up... As time went on I began to have this same apiffany that the music industry would be the spawn of a new wave of black on black crime... I notice that the music sent a plethora of mixed messages... On one hand You had X-Clan, P.E., Ice Cube, and Ice T, pushing hardcore political message and other groups such as: Geto Boys, 2 Live Crew, Compton Most Wanted, NWA that were on the cusp of wanting kick a message but also wanted to get played, payed, and gain more listners.... I don't have beef with Hip Hop I love it all... I came from the time when it was a baby and it was appreicated for more than just club music... It has always been a music that spoke to the young and the young at heart... It was way to educate the masses of what was going on in the streets,GOD,Our Culture, and politricks... all I say to the youth that impart their Wisdom through Hip Hop is to remember that there will be another generation of children after you (us)keep them informed to the truth don't continue to dumb it down... What has been used to get kids locked up or killed, may very well be the the savior that gets us out.... HIP HOP forever and all fakers can eat A Dick... Son you got Public Enemy fucked up... It's the only Hip Hop group that has cats 18 to 60 rocking together... Learn your Hip Hop History be wise and know Your Culture... Fool

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  170. This story is so absurd it hurts me to read all of the comments endorsing it as "plausible"

    Lets start in the 1980s (86 I believe) when the mandatory sentencing laws went into effect. That year the incarceration rate skyrocketed as the law now forced small-time narcotics violators to do a minimum time behind bars. Due to these minimum sentencing laws the prison industry started to boom.

    This is where the story starts to really make no sense. By 1991, the prison industry was doing fantastic. Check out this graph if you dont believe me.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:US_incarceration_timeline-clean-fixed-timescale.svg

    (Its wiki yes, but it has sources and if you go pretty much anywhere else you will find the same data.)

    Anyways, with the prison industry already set on a road of increased incarceration there comes the really REALLY IMPORTANT QUESTION people should be asking about this letter- Why would the private prison industry want to engage in such grossly unethical and reckless behavior when they already had a good, profitable business model?

    Think about it. It makes little sense. they were already set up for years and years of profitable business, why risk doing something unethical, that they could get in trouble for, and that had no guarantee to work?

    It makes no sense and neither does this mans story. It would make a great movie but it is simply illogical.

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  171. I'm sorry, I was under the impression this article was about corruption? Not racism.

    "Why are foreigners who can't speak english allowed to vote, i only have assume they have no education on American History or even Politics for that matter"

    You're an idiot. Firstly, anybody who has immigrated to the United States and been given Citizenship is allowed to vote because that's how democracy works. Secondly, if you cared to learn anything at all about American History, you would know that everybody who lives in the United States, and isn't a Native American, comes from a family of immigrants. Many of whom probably came to this country not knowing a word of English.

    I always wonder why idiotic, under educated, over privileged, racist white trash is given the right to vote... Especially since they make up a huge percentage of the people on welfare and food stamps which you complain about like they're a plague in your beautiful nation. Then I remember America has a long History with white people thinking they own the place, and anybody else who lives in it.

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  172. I don't know, this could be majorly bogus. Please give me more information on these so-called 'private prisons.' The one's that our tax payers dollars go to? I'm not bashing this, as I whole-heartedly believe it could be 100% true - music is possibly one of the most influential outlets in the world today. At the same time, though, the most popular music today isn't even rap music, it's just regular, stupid, senile, boy-band music with little lyrics beyond 'today is happy!' I don't really know, i'm a bit overwhelmed at the moment of how much of a possibility it is that this is true, but I cannot help but be a little sceptic as i'm sure everyone knows the saying 'don't believe everything you hear.' If this guy/girl had really been through all of this, he'd/she'd do a hell of a lot more than just write a little post on the internet. If he/she was such a successful person in the early days of rap, he/she would know how to utilize the right tools in order to get his/her voice heard and his/her words said to the most amount of ears possible - it's simple. Maybe he/she is just constantly scared - but that's what we have things like witness protection for. If he's/she's really trying to make a difference and since he's/she's grown now and I doubt he/she has kids, this person should tell everyone.

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  173. Funny, no one asked for confirmation of Bin Laden's death but you don't believe this is true. I was born in the late 70's and raised in the 80's. I remember when Hip Hop changed. I remember when drug dealing and gang banging became glorified through music. I remember when prisons started being a private business. I believe every word of it.

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  174. It's all true. I was also at the secret meeting. I was sitting next to Jimmy Iovine, Russell Simmons, Kool G Rap and Spiderman. The meeting was cut short after a record exec made David Banner angry. I think I still have my "The Secret Meeting Weekend 1991" tee shirt that Stussy made.

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  175. I cannot believe people even contemplate that this story cannot be true. For fucks sake, your talking about the decendents of people that used the bible to say it was ok to ship a load of people against their will to work for free.

    One commentor said, 'thats the way it has always been, niggaz killing niggaz even without hiphop'. People kill people from the dawn of time you stupid NIGGA, look at the 3 strike rule that came out in the early 90s that coincide with this article ? if your that stupid you can't even put two and two together then expect to be the victim of the next white man's plot to futher bring us down...

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  176. Ive noticed that it seems like every rap artist, every single rap song, and every theme and album is about selling drugs, being a killer, abusing women. I didnt think much of it, till I moved to a small town in Ohio, and seen that half the young people in this town are cathcing felonies, ruining their lives, and losing their kids to the system. They all Love rap music, its part of the culture. I actually dont fit in here cuz Im not like that. My boyfriend is in jail right now, and is fixing to be a great "drug dealer", thats what he says. We broke up cuz I didnt believe in his "dream". He listened to rap music constantly, he was obscessed with it. I can also see occult symbols in many of the rap music videos

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  177. Yes! It matters to people in small town America! I like rap music too, and I dont go out there and commit crime, but Im saying many people I care about do. They do, and they take it to heart, and it does matter. Its ruined lives is what Im saying, and its so so so mainstream now, its rediculous

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  178. Ive noticed that it seems like every rap artist, every single rap song, and every theme and album is about selling drugs, being a killer, abusing women. I didnt think much of it, till I moved to a small town in Ohio, and seen that half the young people in this town are cathcing felonies, ruining their lives, and losing their kids to the system. They all Love rap music, its part of the culture. I actually dont fit in here cuz Im not like that. My boyfriend is in jail right now, and is fixing to be a great "drug dealer", thats what he says. We broke up cuz I didnt believe in his "dream". He listened to rap music constantly, he was obscessed with it. I can also see occult symbols in many of the rap music videos

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  179. "This anonymous letter landed in my inbox about a minute ago:"

    Oh, a minute ago? So you read the whole thing in a min. Cool Story bro.

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  180. How are so many people lapping this up with a spoon?

    What this article suggests is that Biggie and Tupac were man-made creations of the white corporate elite, because they wanted to fill their prisons?

    Firstly, what a strange and random investment...privately-owned prisons.

    Secondly, what a strange investment for a bunch of music executives...

    Thirdly, how odd that all of these labels, hundreds of music executives, all chipped in to this investment...

    Fourthly, amazing that dozens of people were there but there has been not a peep of this...

    Fifthly, this theory suggests that we have literally NO control over our own opinions. Let's pretend that record execs /did/ push gangster rap on us (which I could believe, but not for these reasons), well then, WE made it popular by listening to it.

    BS. Absolute BS.

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  181. 2 words: horse shit.

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  182. That's some crazy stuff right there. Slavery all over again

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  183. He's from Europe dumbass

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  184. Ish like this is for the truly ignorant, and by ignorant I mean those who would rather read something quick on the Internet or watch a youtube video, then claim to have all sorts of knowledge and insight, meanwhile they've rarely, if ever, picked up a book, don't sit with educators or scholars (professional or otherwise) yet claim to know all the mysteries of the universe. I'm surprised I didn't see someone say the person was anonymous because its really Tupac who wrote this, that's why he had to fake his death. LOL Straight bullocks this is!!! Stop smoking and sitting on ya ass not doing shit, wake up read, get educated and get on the frontline in your community and stop believing everything you see/read online just because it "sounds about right." So Im guessing if these people didn't meet we'd still be listening to PE and KRSOne and crack would have neeeeevvvver been invented, right. smh

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  185. Agreed, so many holes in this story. I call BS.

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  186. in the end...the consumer makes the decision. just b/c gangsta rap was promoted, no one had to buy into it...if the consumer had a problem w/ it could have rejected it, seek the "conscious artists". just b/c they are serving shit, you dont have to eat it!

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  187. The new commercial shit is what it is..."SHIT". No matter what you think, say or read.
    I am one to talk cause I've been a hardcore DJ/Turntablist for 21 years & counting. Since 1991 I've heard & seen it all & the shit that's "hot" right now & plastered all over the place is straight WASCK as fuck. Garbage. All the swaggots can't rock steez and never will. Long live True School Hip Hop & True School Hip Hop ISN'T DEAD, it lives UNDERGROUND, away from the weak minded.

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  188. It's hard to believe this story because everyone involved in it is listed as anonymous and, based on the written article (I didn't have time for the video), there isn't any hard evidence backing up what the author is saying. As much as I'd like the believe the story I can't.

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  189. Hello friends,
    I will share this ,The story may or may not be true but it makes a lot of good sense,so thanks for it.

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  190. Agreed with the shitty spelling and grammer, tough to take serious. Regardless if the story is made up and there wasn't actually a secret meeting as described there was a clear shift in mainstream (major label) hip-hop around that time - but record label executives wouldn't be stupid enough to load up on a bunch of stock with private prisons and think it wouldn't ever leak. Fuckin' blows for the kids growing up today..

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  191. All influences count get real. Your environment and the music you listen too, (cause music is part of your environment). Take Eminem for example. I have no idea what really happened but he was talking a lot of shit and then on the Encore album made a song about the president. All the sudden Proof gets shot and Em. disappears for like 5 years. Now he's back and he has an all seeing eye necklace, has either Jay-Z or Lil Wayne by his side at all times, and he's apologizing for shit. In Talking To Myself he says he almost dissed Lil Wayne, then says sorry, and says Lil Wayne is better then him and would hand him his ass! What? Proof not being an Icon would be easier to kill and a good message sent to Em to shut up and do what he's told. In Eminem's songs he says himself he feels responsible for Proof getting shot. Why is that? One of my peeps works at a call center and it has two other call centers at the company selling stuff on the phone. The one she works at is at an office building and she gets payed pretty decent plus bonus of like 5 dollars a call. Well the other two call centers for her company are at 2 prisons. They pay prisoners 25 cents per hour for calling people, and the bonus for every sale made go's not to the prisoners but to the boss, and instead of 5 dollars a sale it is 35 dollars a sale, (I assume so high a bonus for boss cause workers make nothing). So you see prison is big business beyond just what the Government pays them. I did a year in prison myself and had a job. They payed me 25 cents an hour also, and that was considered good pay cause after 8 hours of work I could purchase a pack of smokes. It was like 65 dollars a month. Now I was working at a slaughter house for the prison in Jackson Mi, (South Side at Parnell) and we were cutting steaks all day for that wage that were probably going to be sold for a lot in comparison. Prison IS big business just like Big Government!

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  192. I'm not surprised to read something so appalling. Those who agreed to such a thing should be castrated, all for money. However, I think the world needs to start ignoring the lyrics, to simply enjoy listening to the music but not bring it in to their lives, what power has music got if the populaton doesn't mimick the violence in the music? Maybe as adults, Parents, and teachers and other influential good people should start educating Children from an early age that music is there to listen to not to live by, Maybe even take the time to learn more about the artists who sing the songs and find the positive GOOD things they do and highlight it and show that although they might sing those lyrics in their normal daily life they do good and they send out love and not hate, crime and voilence. We can not stop people buying the music but we can try and educate young people who are easily influenced, anything is wroth a try, sitting back thinking the hands are tied is not the way to deal with it, If the this kind of thing can happen, if Rap can influence young people to become criminals and act in voilence and so fourth, then they can also be influenced to NOT do it. Love can conquer all and children and young people now more than ever need it showing up in every arena, the more love can be seen the more violence and crime from these songs can be muted. Love can give way to hate as along as people are putting it out there for the world to see.

    Whether this is was a real event or not, things still need to change. Music is suppose to be entertainment not a guide to how we should leave our lives.

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  193. More people need to read this, and more people definitely need to hear about this.

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  194. The way I.see it don't.really matter how much u no bout the government or illuminated honkeys unless people grows sum balls and rise up ain't shit gone change know ur enemy but also know thyself we can sit here and debate bout wut we cud shudder and wud do but wut makes y'all think we ever gone see these "unfamiliar" folks or these "illuminati " we no wut they want us to no bout them they invented Google and internet so don't u think they know wuts on it in regards to them? Think bout the severity of the situation we as the so called normal folks is in we are FUCKED and ain't a God datum thing we can do bout it don't matter how many books u. Read or websites u search cuz them whiteboys will always be ages steps ahead painful but true ...

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  195. This story is just awful... What has the world come to? Since when is it okay to promote criminal behaviors for any reason?

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  196. The evil and greed in the world is unfathomable but this rings true. Everyone who hears about it should spread the word.
    The enemies of the individual freedom which is what makes the United States the envy of the world have been working overtime to spread hate and division to enslave humanity in the outside world and now hearing of this evil profiteering from manufacturing criminal behavior on innocent kids so they can keep their private jails full. I hope when the people doing this die they burn in hell for eternity- this is the ultimate evil.

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  197. This comment has been removed by the author.

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